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FAQ
Welcome to the RPA Online F-A-Q. Here you will find answers to common enquiries that we recieve.
Click Here to ask the RPA your question(s)
 What is the Renewable Power Association?
 Who does the RPA represent?
 Why was the RPA formed?
 Why do producers and generators need their own voice?
 Is RPA only for generators?
 Aren't producers too diverse to form a single association?
 What are the qualifications for joining the RPA?
 How does RPA relate to the other renewables Trade Associations?
 How does RPA relate to the Association of Electricity Producers?
 Aren't there now too many renewables trade associations?
 How will RPA handle conflicts between different renewables technologies?
 Does RPA represent all technologies in the UK renewable energy industry?
 What functions does the RPA perform?
What is the Renewable Power Association?
The Renewable Power Association (RPA) is a trade association which has been formed to promote the UK renewable energy industry.
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Who does the RPA represent?
The RPA may take positions on all manner of policy issues, but legitimacy comes only from representing members or other groups with their permission. At launch in October 2001, 43 founder members generated over 50% of all UK Renewable power. Membership in July 2002 reached a total of 96. The RPA specifically does not represent any individual technology group. Members are required to support general aims of the association, but ultimately determine policy.
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Why was the RPA formed?
The RPA was formed in answer to a widely expressed view in industry and government that a balanced view was required to integrate the voice of investor/generators in renewable energy. The principles of the RPA reflect transparency, inclusive democracy and communication in response to these desires.
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Why do producers and generators need their own voice?
It is a sign that the renewables market has "come of age". Now that the milestone of 1GW of declared net capacity (DNC) of new renewable electricity in the UK has been passed, the industry has sufficient critical mass to assemble the resources appropriate to a more mature market. The perspective of the producer/generator has many unique features, which are nonetheless important to the whole industry - such as taking project development risk.
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Is RPA only for generators?
No; the RPA believes that its activities are good for the interests of all participants in the renewable energy marketplace, including producers of renewable electricity, heat and fuels, project developers, electricity suppliers, manufacturers, intermediaries, advisers, financiers, fuel suppliers and site owners. The RPA welcomes as members anyone who shares this view. Anything which encourages the production of renewable energy also encourages all the businesses ancillary to that production.
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Aren't producers too diverse to form a single association?
RPA believes that producers of renewable energy have more in common than divides them. In particular, they need a strong long-term market for green energy and policies which facilitate that market's growth.
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What are the qualifications for joining the RPA?
The RPA relies on a shared outlook rather than a membership qualification. Anyone who shares our vision for the growth of the UK renewable energy industry is welcome to join.
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How does RPA relate to the other renewables Trade Associations?
RPA recognises the roles of the technology-specific "First Tier" trade associations, each of which focuses on a single sector of the renewable energy market. RPA works with these where appropriate.

The RPA now has a number of resource groups, which deal with technology-specific areas.

See the link to the document below which describes the RPA's resource group structure.

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How does RPA relate to the Association of Electricity Producers?
RPA strongly supports the AEP as the leading body representing all electricity generators. RPA hopes that AEP will continue its activities in relation to renewables, in particular through AEP's Renewable Energy Committee. AEP provides strong expertise on electricity market and infrastructure issues (such as embedded generation) while RPA will provide expertise from the perspective of the developer, owner and operator of renewable plant.
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Aren't there now too many renewables trade associations?
For a fully mature marketplace, this would be true, but the renewables market is both growing in size and evolving in structure and nature. The number and complexity of policy issues involved, and the potential impact and benefits of focussed lobbying therefore justify the extra resources represented by the different associations. It is crucial that the associations are well focussed and cooperative with each other, and RPA expects to be able to contribute in a positive way to achieving this.
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How will RPA handle conflicts between different renewables technologies?
RPA believes that the issues which unite us are more important and more numerous than those which divide us. Where common positions can be developed, RPA will champion them; where they cannot, RPA will restrict its role to ensuring that policy makers and decision makers are fully, accurately and clearly informed. RPA will leave it to the technology-specific associations to develop single-sector policy issues. RPA is aware of concerns about potential conflicts and intends to devote significant effort to conflict resolution.
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Does RPA represent all technologies in the UK renewable energy industry?
Yes in relation to producer/generator issues which are common to all technologies. RPA already has members covering wind, waste, biomass, landfill gas, photovoltaics, sewage gas, small hydro and renewable natural gas. RPA will represent the viewpoint of all renewables technologies equally, focusing on the perspective of the producer and on what producers of renewable energy have in common. RPA will not, however, replace the role of the technology-specific trade associations - it will seek to enhance and complement that role.
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What functions does the RPA perform?
The RPA will perform the following primary functions:
  • Policy Development & Lobbying - to UK, European and International governments and authorities, the public, NGOs and the media.
  • Marketing & Promotion - to ensure wider recognition of the benefits of renewables and the achievements of the UK renewable energy industry in the UK and abroad.
  • Member Services, including seminars, training, communication and networking within the renewable energy industry.
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